Disclosures

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Disclosures

Disclosures

Disclosures

The statement below is provided with the intent to be transparent regarding information which will help students and prospective students feel confident in their decisions regarding their education.

The information below is provided in compliance with various state, federal and accreditation requirements. It is the intent of Grace Christian University to be transparent regarding information which will help students and prospective students make the best decision regarding their education.

HIGHER EDUCATION EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND REPORTING - Emergency Financial Aid Grants to Students
  1. An acknowledgment that the institution signed and returned to the Department
    the Certification and Agreement and the assurance that the institution has used, or intends to
    use, no less than 50 percent of the funds received under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES
    Act to provide Emergency Financial Aid Grants to students.
    HEERF Studentcertificationagreement42020
  2. The total amount of funds that the institution will receive or has received from the
    Department pursuant to the institution’s Certification and Agreement [for]
    Emergency Financial Aid Grants to Students. $1,801,512
  3. The total amount of Emergency Financial Aid Grants distributed to students under Section
    18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act as of the date of submission (i.e., as of the 30-day Report and
    every 45 days thereafter). $1,580,773
  4. The estimated total number of students at the institution eligible to participate in programs
    under Section 484 in Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and thus eligible to receive
    Emergency Financial Aid Grants to students under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act. 1,495
  5. The total number of students who have received an Emergency Financial Aid Grant to
    students under Section 18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act. 1,495
  6. The method(s) used by the institution to determine which students receive
    Emergency Financial Aid Grants and how much they would receive under Section
    18004(a)(1) of the CARES Act.
    HEERF Student COVID Expenses Survey – Google Forms
    HEERF Reasonable & Customary Calc
    HEERF Minimum Disbursement Calc
    HEERF Meeting Agenda 5_26_20 – Eligibility
  7. Any instructions, directions, or guidance provided by the institution to students concerning
    the Emergency Financial Aid Grants.
    HEERF Grace Christian Mail – Important Information about the CARES Act
    HEERF Eligibility Letter to Students
    HEERF Grace Christian Mail – CASH FOR COVID – To Students with Survey
    HEERF Grace Christian Mail – Relief check on the way this week!
    HEERF Grace Christian Mail – FAQ’s from students invited to register 7-22-21
    HEERF Grace Christian Mail – Opportunity to register for FA-21 semester 7-22-21
    HEERF Grace Christian Mail -Grant Posted to Your Account 9-14-21
HIGHER EDUCATION EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND REPORTING – Emergency Grants to Institutions
ASSIGNMENT OF CREDITS, PROGRAM LENGTH, & TUITION

Grace Christian University seeks to comply with Policy FDCR.A.10.020 of the Higher Learning Commission:

An institution shall be able to equate its learning experiences with semester or quarter credit hours using practices common to institutions of higher education, to justify the lengths of its programs in comparison to similar programs found in accredited institutions of higher education, and to justify any program-specific tuition in terms of program costs, program length, and program objectives. 

This policy addresses three key areas:

1. PROGRAM LENGTH

The program length of all degrees is stipulated by the State of Michigan in the document published in October 2003, POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ON THE ESTABLISHMENT AND APPROVAL OF NONPUBLIC COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN MICHIGAN:

  • An associate degree shall be granted only after the successful completion of at least 60 semester hours or equivalent of collegiate level study.
  • A bachelor’s degree shall be granted only after the successful completion of 120 semester hours or equivalent of collegiate level study.
  • A master’s degree shall be granted only after the successful completion of the requirements for a bachelors degree and at least 30 semester hours of credit or the equivalent in courses applicable to the graduate degree.

The following table lists the degrees and program lengths offered at Grace Christian University:

Associate of Arts Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Music Master of Arts

General Studies (60 cr)

Human Services (60 cr)

Leadership & Ministry
(60 cr)

Psychology (60 cr)

Criminal Justice (60 cr)

Business (60 cr)

Biblical Studies (120 cr)

Human Services (120 cr)

Psychology (120 cr)

Criminal Justice (120 cr)

Business (120 cr)

Leadership & Ministry
(120 cr)

Interdisciplinary Studies (120 cr)

Worship Arts (120 cr)

Ministry (36 cr)

Organizational Leadership (30 cr)

 

Grace Christian University also offers the Bachelor of Religious Education, for which the State of Michigan gives the following stipulations:

The Bachelor of Religious Education degree would be based, in addition to other requirements, on a major in Bible Literature and shall be based on the completion of a four-year collegiate level courses, including the major in Bible and two minors of 15 semester hours in general education areas.

The Bachelor of Religious Education degree at Grace Christian University is only offered in partnerships with Cornerstone and Davenport Universities so that graduating students earn two degrees: the Bachelor of Religious Education from Grace Christian University and the appropriate bachelor-level degree from the respective partner institution.  As a result, the number of credits necessary to earn the degrees will vary but meet the State of Michigan’s minimum requirements.

2. CREDIT HOURS

Grace Christian University also seeks to comply with the federal guidelines for the credit hour:

A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

  • One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or (2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other activities as established by and institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading toward the award of credit hours. 34CFR 600.2 (11/1/2010)

While the course offerings are diverse in modality and calendar, all courses are expected to meet certain minimum work load requirements.  For on-campus and hybrid classes, these requirements include both direct faculty instruction and out-of-class student work.  For undergraduate and graduate online courses, these requirements include student work completed under the direction of a faculty member.

  • For the on-campus undergraduate program, a semester hour represents 750 minutes of classroom instruction and 1500 minutes of student work outside of class or its equivalent (37 ½ hours per semester hour).
  • For the online undergraduate program, a semester hour represents 2,250 minutes of coursework or its equivalent (37 ½ hours per semester hour).
  • For the graduate online program, a semester hour represents 3,000 miniues of coursework or its evalualent (50 hours per semester hour).
Type of Course Minimum Work Load

All undergraduate three credit courses (on-campus/hybrid/online)

All undergraduate two credit courses (on-campus only)

All undergraduate one credit courses (on-campus only)

All graduate three credit courses (online only)

112 ½ hours

75 hours

37 ½ hours

150 hours

On-Campus Program

To ensure that this minimum work load is met, faculty members complete a course work load worksheet for each course taught on campus.  This worksheet is submitted and reviewed before the course is taught.  This information regarding the minimum work load is included in each course syllabus which must also be peer-reviewed prior to the beginning of classes.

 

Besides the minimum work load, every effort is made to ensure adequate seat time.  The on-campus program is primarily based on the traditional fall and spring semesters.  The fall semester is fourteen weeks, while the spring semester is fifteen weeks.  When establishing the calendar for each semester in the on-campus program, the registrar’s office seeks to ensure a minimum seat time requirement of 12 ½ hours (750 minutes) per credit hour is met.  This calculation is based on 50 minutes times 15 weeks. 

However, each course  may vary in how this time is structured:

  • Some three-credit classes meet twice each week for 90 minutes for a minimum of 25 sessions for a total of 37 ½ hours of seat time.
  • Other three-credit classes meet once each week in 3 ¾ hour blocks for a minimum of 10 sessions for a total of 37 ½ hours of seat time.
  • “Early Fall” courses meet for ten sessions over three weeks before the start of the regular semester. Three credit courses meet for a total of 40 hours of seat time, while two credit courses meet for 25 hours of seat time.
  • Internships require students to complete 120 hours of field education in lieu of seat time.
  • Private music lessons and group ensembles are available for students to take for one credit. Beyond the scheduled meeting times, students are expected to practice regularly.
  • Students may enroll in team sports and/or activity classes for one credit graded as a pass/fail. This grade is based largely on their participation in scheduled practices and activities.
  • Courses designed for high school students participating in dual enrollment must also meet the minimum work load requirements (112 ½ hours).
  • Online and hybrid courses (including both F2F instruction and online activities) offered as part of the on-campus program must also meet the specified minimum work load requirements (112 ½ hours).

Online and Graduate Programs

Both the online and graduate programs use pre-designed curriculum guides which have been reviewed by faculty and staff to ensure compliance with the minimum work load requirements.  Online courses offered at the undergraduate level offered as part of the academic program aimed at adult learners are three credits each and five weeks in length. These courses must still meet the minimum work load requirement of 112 ½ hours.  Graduate courses, which are offered exclusively online, are also three credits each and are six weeks in length.  The minimum work load requirement for these graduate courses is 150 hours.

3. TUITION COSTS

Grace Christian University is committed to being reasonably priced when compared with other local institutions of higher education, as well as similar faith-based institutions throughout the country.  Each academic program (on-campus, online, and graduate) has its own tuition rate, which is established and approved by the board of directors annually.  These tuition rates, based on modality and degree level, are in large part determined by competitive analyses of similar programs of study in each modality offered at other institutions.

GRIEVANCE POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Most matters of conflict or disagreement can be resolved by meeting individually with the offending party. Grace Christian University asks that any member of the community with a complaint against another member or entity first attempt to seek a resolution by meeting with the individual with whom they are in conflict. Whether or not an individual meeting has taken place, students have the right to submit a formal complaint. This process is initiated by completing a Formal Grievance Form. The Academic Provost maintains a record of these complaints as well as the processing of complaints according to University policies.

If the student is not able to satisfactorily resolve the complaint or grievance with the University, the student has a right to submit his or her complaint to the State of Michigan or either of the institution’s accrediting bodies.

Higher Learning Commission: hlcommision.org

Commission on Accreditation, Association for Biblical Higher Education: abhe.org

Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity, Postsecondary Schools: https://www.michigan.gov/leo/bureaus-agencies/wd/pss

TRANSFER POLICIES

See “Admission Information” in the appropriate catalog:
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS

See “University Partnerships” in the appropriate catalog:
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Verification of Student Identity

The purpose of this policy is to ensure that Grace Christian University operates in compliance with the provisions of the United States Federal Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), Public Law 110-315 and Higher Learning Commission Policy FDCR.A.10.050 concerning the verification of student identity in distance learning. All credit-bearing courses and programs offered through distance learning methods must verify that the student who registers for a distance education course or program is the same student who participates in and completes the course or program and receives academic credit.

In verifying the identity of students who participate in class or coursework the institution may make use of one or more methods at the option of the institution, which may include but need not be limited to: (1) secure login and pass code; (2) proctored examinations; and (3) new or other technologies and practices that are effective in verifying the identity of students. Such methods must have reasonable and appropriate safeguards to protect student privacy. Institutions must notify students at the time of registration or enrollment of any projected additional student charges associated with the verification of student identity such as separate fees charged by proctoring services, etc.  (HLC Policy FDCR.A.10.050)

  1. Each student is assigned a unique username and password to log into the University’s learning management system (currently Blackboard). Students are responsible for providing complete and true information in any identification verification process.
  2. An account is provided to an individual for the exclusive use by that individual. Attempting to discover another user’s password or attempts to gain unauthorized access to another person’s account is prohibited. It is against University policy for a user to give someone his or her password or allow others to use his or her account. Users are responsible for any and all users of their account. Users are responsible for all activity on their accounts.
  3. Instructors will emphasize the academic integrity policy stated in the catalog and communication with students, as well as use normal teaching practices (e.g., reviewing student writing, conferencing with students) to verify student identity.
  4. Any student found to have permitted another student to represent them for any portion of an online course will be dismissed from the course and may face further punitive measures including dismissal from the University.
  5. All users of the University’s learning management system are responsible for maintaining the security of usernames, passwords, and other access credentials as required.

All methods of verifying student identity must protect the privacy of student information in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and any other applicable laws or regulations regarding the confidentiality of personally identifiable information, and the University’s Privacy Policy.

Campus Safety

Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act

Information regarding crime statistics at Grace Christian University posted in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Annual reports which contain three years of crime statistics, campus security policies, statements of victims’ rights, and sexual assault policies must be made available under this act. In addition, timely warnings of criminal threats to the entire campus population must be made available. Grace Christian University combines Campus Safety report with Annual Fire Statistics.

2022 Campus Safety
2019 Campus Safety
2018 Campus Safety
2017 Campus Safety
2016 Campus Safety
2015 Campus Safety
2014 Campus Safety
2013 Campus Safety

Required Title IV Disclosures

There have been no federal investigations related to disclosure of Title IV information.

Student Outcome Data: Retention, Graduation, & Employment

The Student Right-to-Know regulations require all colleges and universities participating in federally funded financial aid programs to document information on the cohort of first-time, full-time freshmen entering the institution on or after July 1, 1996. Disclosure is not required until 150% of the estimated program length has elapsed. All colleges and universities entering into Program Participation Agreements with the Department of Education are required to complete the IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey of 1997 (Section 490 of the Higher Education Amendments of 1992, P.L. 102- 325.106. Stat. 448). Graduation and retention rates are those Grace Christian University reports to the Integrated Postsecondary Data System (IPEDS).

Bachelor’s Degree Graduation and Completion Rates

  • Transfer, part-time, and non-degree students are not included in the graduation/completion rate.
  • The graduation rate is based on six years of attendance which equates to 150% of the longest program.
  • The graduation/completion rate does not include students who left the institution to serve in the armed forces, with an official church mission organization, or in the foreign service of the federal government. Students who died or were totally and permanently disabled are also excluded.
  • The institution is not required to report the transfer-out rate since the mission of the institution does not include providing substantial preparation for students to enroll in other institutions.
Year of Entry Undergraduate, First-Time, Full-Time, Bachelor-Degree Seeking Students Enrolled 6 Year (150%) Graduation Rate
2011 68 49%
2012 86 51%
2013 90 47%
2014 72 39%
2015 84 55%

Bachelor’s Degree Retention Rates

  • First-time, full-time, bachelor’s degree-seeking, freshmen who returned for their second year of study.
Year of Entry Undergraduate, First-Time, Full-Time, Bachelor-Degree Seeking Students Enrolled 1 Year Retention Rate
(Students who returned for the following fall semester)
Fall 2015 85 66%
Fall 2016 70 62%
Fall 2017 66 61%
Fall 2018 85 72%
Fall 2019 109 66%
Fall 2020 67 78%

EMPLOYMENT/GRADUATE STUDIES RATES

While Grace Christian University does not formally place students in jobs or guarantee employment, the University is concerned that graduating students are fulfilling the mission of the University through employment in their degree fields or are pursuing further studies. Rate is based on status six months year after graduation.

How is “First Destination” defined?

“Destination” is defined as full-time employment (30 hours or more per week) or continuing education within six months of graduation.

How are “First Destination” rates determined?

Each year, Grace Christian University surveys the current year’s graduates to determine their full-time employment or continuing education status within six months after commencement. The tables below report the results of the survey by On Campus Bachelor-Degree, Online Bachelor-Degree, and Online Master-Degree graduates.

 

First Destination Survey Results – On Campus Bachelor’s Degree Graduates

Year

Response Rate
(percentage of current-year graduates who completed the survey)

Destination Rate
(percentage of responses either continuing education or employed full-time)
2017 97% 89%
2018 97% 87%
2019 100% 76%
2020 63% 77%
2021 54% 70%
2022 55% 69%

First Destination Survey Results – Online Bachelor-Degree Graduates

Year

Response Rate
(percentage of current-year graduates who completed the survey)

Destination Rate
(percentage of responses either continuing education or employed full-time)
2017 49% 76%
2018 96% 65%
2019 67% 76%
2020 42% 60%
2021 34% 47%
2022 48% 80%

First Destination Survey Results – Online Master’s Degree Graduates

Year

Response Rate
(percentage of current-year graduates who completed the survey)

Destination Rate
(percentage of responses either continuing education or employed full-time)
2017 97% 38%
2018 100% 85%
2019 83% 80%
2020 53% 88%
2021 38% 80%
2022 95% 71%
Completion Data

July 1, 2020 – June 30, 2021

Associate’s Degree

Non-Resident Alien Hispanic / Latino American Indian / Alaska Native Asian Black / African American Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander White 2+ Races Race/ Ethnicity Unknown TOTAL
Men 0 3 1 0 9 0 24 3 4 44
Women 0 5 0 0 22 0 33 3 9 72
Total 0 8 1 0 31 0 57 6 13 116

Bachelor’s Degree

Non-Resident Alien Hispanic / Latino American Indian / Alaska Native Asian Black / African American Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander White 2+ Races Race/ Ethnicity Unknown TOTAL
Men 0 4 1 1 9 0 39 0 1 55
Women 1 7 0 1 10 0 37 0 4 60
Total 1 11 1 2 19 0 76 0 5 115

Master’s Degree

Non-Resident Alien Hispanic / Latino American Indian / Alaska Native Asian Black / African American Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander White 2+ Races Race/ Ethnicity Unknown TOTAL
Men 0 0 0 0 3 0 7 0 3 13
Women 0 1 0 0 4 0 7 0 1 13
Total 0 1 0 0 7 0 14 0 4 26

Grand Total

Non-Resident Alien Hispanic / Latino American Indian / Alaska Native Asian Black / African American Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander White 2+ Races Race/ Ethnicity Unknown TOTAL
Total Men 0 7 2 1 21 0 70 3 8 112
Total Women 1 13 0 1 36 0 77 3 14 145
Grand Total 1 20 2 2 57 0 147 6 22 257

This information is based on the 2020-2021 IPEDS report.  Further completions data for students receiving Pell grants is made available through the College Navigator website:  https://nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator/?q=Grace+Christian&s=all&id=170000#outcome.

Process of Withdrawal

See “Registration” under “Academic Policies”  in the appropriate catalog:
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Policies Related to Title IV Financial Aid

See “Financial Information”  in the appropriate catalog:
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Academic Programs

See “Program Information”  in the appropriate catalog: 
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Faculty

See “Faculty” in the appropriate catalog: 
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Disabled Students

Grace Christian University is committed to serving students with disabilities, with the goal to ensure that every student who has a disability is protected from discrimination and provided with access to the needed services that will ensure equal access to all activities and programs pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

The University provides assistance to students with visual impairments, learning disabilities, mobility impairments, hearing impairments, chronic health conditions (including allergies), psychological disabilities and temporary disabilities so they may enjoy a complete range of academic and non-academic opportunities.  These accommodations include:

  • wheelchair accessible traditional style (one story) residence halls for men and women;
  • Scan in/push button automatic doors to assist students on residence halls, student common spaces and the academic building;
  • wheelchair accessible ramps within the Student Commons to access all spaces provided for any student;
  • wheelchair ramp access to the chapel;
  • large projector and flat screens in classrooms and chapel;
  • spaces in classrooms for wheelchair accessibility.

In accordance with the spirit of the legislative updates to the ADA, documentation requirements vary by situation. Because each person’s situation is unique, students in need of physical accommodations should talk with the Student Affairs staff to ensure their needs are met.

In addition to physical accommodations, the University also seeks to serve students with learning disabilities in all academic program.

See “Academic Accommodations” in the appropriate catalog: 
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Policy on Study Abroad

See “Study Abroad” in the appropriate catalog: 
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

See “Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)” in the appropriate catalog:
Online Undergraduate – On Campus Undergraduate – Graduate Online

Learning Objectives & Outcomes